girls pee their pants

Indianapolis Pollen Counts for Thursday May 28th and Friday May 29th, 2015

For the past two days the tree pollen counts were high; 111 for Thursday and 146 for today. The pollens were mulberry, hickory, walnut, and black willow.
Grass pollen was moderate for both days- 16 and 11.The weed Plantain was high on Thursday at 56 and moderate at 41 today.
When you see those ‘cottonballs’ floating around- the seed of the cottonwood tree, it usually marks the beginning of the grass season.

May 29, 2015

 

 

 

 

FEL 5/29/2015

May 29, 2015 · fleickly · No Comments
Tags: , , , , ,  · Posted in: Grass pollen, Grass Pollen Counts, Pollen Counting, Pollen Counting- Indianapolis, Seasonal Allergies, Seasonal Allergies-Pollen Counts, Tree Pollen Counts, Weed Pollen

Indianapolis Pollen Counts for Wednesday May 27th, 2015

Same old pollen story for today- high tree counts (494), moderate grass counts (15), and high weed numbers(172). Same species- plantain for the weed and the trees were; oak, mulberry, hickory, and walnut.

May 27, 2015

 

 

 

 

FEL 5/27/2015

May 27, 2015 · fleickly · No Comments
Tags: , , , , ,  · Posted in: Grass pollen, Grass Pollen Counts, Pollen Counting, Pollen Counting- Indianapolis, Seasonal Allergies, Seasonal Allergies-Pollen Counts, Tree Pollen Counts, Weed Pollen

Indianapolis Pollen Counts for Tuesday May 26th, 2015

Tree pollens were high today at 343 with the same array as the past few days- mulberry, hickory, and walnut. Grass pollen was moderate at 10. Finally, weed pollen was high at 165.

May 26, 2015

 

 

 

 

FEL 5/26/2015

 

May 26, 2015 · fleickly · No Comments
Tags: , , , , ,  · Posted in: Grass pollen, Grass Pollen Counts, Pollen Counting, Pollen Counting- Indianapolis, Seasonal Allergies, Seasonal Allergies-Pollen Counts, Tree Pollen Counts, Weed Pollen

Indianapolis Pollen Counts for Monday May 25th, 2015

Tree pollen high at 370 with mulberry, walnut and hickory tree pollen. Weeds were high at 249- plantain was the only weed. Finally, grass pollen was moderate (one more grain) and it would have been high for today} at 19.
Lot of pine pollen- not included in the count.

May 25, 2015

 

 

 

 

FEL 5/25/2015

May 25, 2015 · fleickly · No Comments
Tags: , , , , ,  · Posted in: Grass pollen, Grass Pollen Counts, Pollen Counting, Pollen Counting- Indianapolis, Seasonal Allergies, Seasonal Allergies-Pollen Counts, Tree Pollen Counts, Weed Pollen

Indianapolis Pollen Counts- May 22-24, 2015

Three days of counts for you.

Friday May 22- Tree 105 (high), Grass 5 (moderate), and Weed 331 (high)

Saturday May 23- Tree 273 (high), Grass 9 (moderate), and Weed 201 (high)

Sunday May 24- Tree 211 (high), Grass 10 (moderate), and Weed 276 (high)

Tee pollens- oak, hickory, walnut, mulberry.
Weed pollen- plantain

May 22-24, 2015

 

 

 

 

FEL 5/24/2015

May 24, 2015 · fleickly · No Comments
Tags: , , , , ,  · Posted in: Grass pollen, Grass Pollen Counts, Pollen Counting, Pollen Counting- Indianapolis, Seasonal Allergies, Seasonal Allergies-Pollen Counts, Tree Pollen Counts, Weed Pollen

Peanut Allergy and Asthma

All too often, the sensational makes the media and the response or rebuttal is never reported or buried somewhere. The report that children with asthma may have undiagnosed peanut sensitivity hit the news this week. This was a presentation at the American Thorasic Society meeting. The study was from Mercy Children’s Hospital in Toledo, Ohio. A chart review was performed on 1,517 children seen in the pediatric pulmonary clinic at that hospital. The charts were reviewed for declarations of peanut allergy and if a blood test was performed for peanut specific antibodies. There were 163 (11%) of the 1,517 who had a documented history of peanut allergy and 665 (44%) who had a blood test performed for peanut. From this group of 665, 148 (22%) had detectable (>0.35 kU/L) levels to peanut. More than half of these children and their families did not suspect that there was any sensitivity to peanut. The author stated that many of the symptoms of peanut allergy can mirror those of an asthma attack, and vice versa.’ The conclusions were that children with asthma may benefit from being tested to peanut, especially with uncontrollable asthma. The authors have also been quoted as saying, ‘If a physician is having this problem (asthma control), or if the parent notices it in his or her asthmatic child, they should consider testing, even if they believe their child is not sensitive to peanuts. Additional statements were made about medications and possible cross-reactivity (This information came from ScienceDaily- Your Source for the latest research news. May 17, 2015).

This is the response by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI), Adverse Reactions to Food Committee’s response to this report and its recommendations. I have copied it for your review. You would need a user id and password to find this on the AAAAI website.

 

Media Alert: AAAAI Adverse Reactions to Foods Committee Responds to Calls for Asthmatic Patients to be Indiscriminately Tested for Peanut Allergies

Misconceptions Over Asthma and Peanut Allergy Study Released at 2015 ATS Meeting Need Clarification

Milwaukee, WI — A new study highlighted during the American Thoracic Society’s Annual Meeting is receiving considerable media attention regarding an association between chronic asthma and peanut sensitization. The study’s authors suggest children who have poorly controlled asthma are more likely to be peanut sensitized, and that such patients may benefit from testing for possible peanut allergy.

The study unfortunately has a misguided premise and conclusion.

A recommendation to test asthmatic patients for peanut allergy will potentially lead to misdiagnosis, and an unnecessary use of resources. Testing for food allergy in the absence of clear symptoms of an acute allergic reaction is never recommended. Despite a high rate of peanut sensitization in this study, there is no relevance to the study’s finding since diagnosing peanut sensitization does not improve asthma control. False positive tests may result in unnecessary avoidance of peanut, which has recently been associated with an increased risk of peanut allergy in certain ages. Peanut allergy needs to be carefully differentiated from asymptomatic sensitization by a food challenge, which was not done in this study. Chronic asthma is not a manifestation of peanut sensitization or allergy, and hence there was no practical value to testing these children since they exhibited no signs of having possible peanut allergy.

The following additional information should help to clarify points of potential misinformation regarding this study and highlight the appropriate role of food allergy testing in patients with asthma: • Food allergy results in specific, acute symptoms (e.g., hives, wheezing, cough, vomiting, etc.) which develop within approximately 2 hours of ingestion of a suspected allergen. Food allergy is a clinical diagnosis characterized by a history of reactions to the food; food allergy testing without clinical history is associated with a false positive rate greater than 50%. In the absence of such a history, testing is not indicated.

• Poorly controlled asthma is not an indication for testing to diagnose a “hidden” food allergy. In this study, allergen testing was not indicated in any of these patients.

•  Food allergy cannot be diagnosed based on the presence of sensitization (positive allergy tests) alone. Such tests cannot be interpreted without a further context of a possible reaction to the food. Moreover, rates of sensitization far exceed the number of individuals that have actual food allergy.

• Though approximately 1/3 of food allergic children develop asthma, and asthma in a food allergic child is a risk factor for severe reactions, there is no role for food testing in patients with chronic asthma. Existing food allergy guidelines strongly indicate testing is not warranted in situations as highlighted in this study.  However, such children may benefit from inhalant allergen testing to better their asthma control.

There is need to additionally clarify another erroneous report that followed release of this study, regarding the risk of possible food allergen content in asthma medication:

• Peanut allergic patients are generally not allergic to soy, and are not advised to avoid soy; the clinical cross reactivity rate between peanut and soy allergy is very low.

• Certain inhalers (Atrovent and Combivent) prescribed for COPD contain soy lecithin, a fatty derivative of soy.  Soy lecithin contains negligible protein and is not considered to be an allergen for soy allergic individuals. Atrovent and Combivent can be used safely for soy allergic patients, and is not contraindicated for peanut allergic patients.

Peanut allergy affects approximately 1-1.5% of the population. Individuals developing symptoms concerning for peanut allergy should be referred to a board certified allergist/immunologist for further assessment.

In 2012 the ABIM Foundation launched Choosing Wisely® with a goal of advancing a national dialogue on avoiding wasteful or unnecessary medical tests, treatments and procedures. As such, Choosing Wisely advocates against diagnostic tests such as immunoglobulin G (lgG) testing or an indiscriminate battery of immunoglobulin E (lgE) tests, in the evaluation of allergy. Allergist/Immunologists know appropriate diagnosis and treatment of allergies requires specific IgE testing (either skin or blood tests) based on the patient’s clinical history. The use of other tests or methods to diagnose allergies is unproven and can lead to inappropriate diagnosis and treatment. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment is both cost effective and essential for optimal patient care.

More information on asthma and Choosing Wisely is available at the AAAAI website. The AAAAI represents allergists, asthma specialists, clinical immunologists, allied health professionals and others with a special interest in the research and treatment of allergic and immunologic diseases. Established in 1943, the AAAAI has more than 6,800 members in the United States, Canada and 72 other countries. The AAAAI’s Find an Allergist/Immunologist service is a trusted resource to help you find a specialist close to home.

 

Very nicely put!

FEL 5/21/2015

May 21, 2015 · fleickly · No Comments
Tags: , ,  · Posted in: Asthma, Peanut Allergy

Indianapolis Pollen Counts for Thursday May 21st, 2015

Tree pollen was moderate at 36, weed pollen also moderate at 26, and the grass pollen count was low at 1 grain of pollen per cubic meter of air sampled. The tree pollens continue to be walnut, hickory, oak, and mulberry. The weed is plantain.

May 21, 2015

 

 

 

 

FEL 5/21/2015

May 21, 2015 · fleickly · No Comments
Tags: , , , , ,  · Posted in: Grass pollen, Grass Pollen Counts, Pollen Counting, Pollen Counting- Indianapolis, Seasonal Allergies, Seasonal Allergies-Pollen Counts, Tree Pollen Counts, Weed Pollen

Indianapolis Pollen Counts for Wednesday May 20th, 2015

I was surprised when I first placed the slide under the scope. Under low magnification I saw many small red dots, scads of them. I was lamenting having to click the counter numerous times- possibly to the point of finger spasm. So on to 400x power- to my surprise most of those dots were the non-allergenic pine pollen. My guess is that your vehicles may have a yellow powder- pine pollen on them.
Despite the cooler weather, tree pollens were at 57- high but just into the high range. Grass pollen was low at 3 and weed pollen was also low at 5.

May 20, 2015

 

 

 

 

FEL 5/20/2015

May 20, 2015 · fleickly · No Comments
Tags: , , , , ,  · Posted in: Grass pollen, Grass Pollen Counts, Pollen Counting, Pollen Counting- Indianapolis, Seasonal Allergies, Seasonal Allergies-Pollen Counts, Tree Pollen Counts, Weed Pollen

Asthma and Peanut Allergy

‘Asthmatics with undiagnosed peanut allergy’.
This presentation at the ATS (American Thorasic Society) meeting has been a very popular press topic over the last few days. It has also caught the attention of the two major organizations that represent allergists- the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI) and the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (ACAAI). Look for warning statements from these two organizations regarding this work. I have only seen summaries from the news. I am waiting to see the poster/abstract prior to commenting.

FEL 5/19/2015

May 19, 2015 · fleickly · No Comments
Posted in: Uncategorized

Indianapolis Pollen Counts for Tuesday May 19th, 2015

Tree pollens and weed pollens were high today. The weed (plantain) count was higher than the tree pollen count- 294 for weeds and 258 for the trees. Grass pollen was moderate at 8 grains of pollen per cubic meter of air sampled for the day. The scale for grass pollen is very different than what is used for trees and weeds. The tree pollens I saw on the rods were those of the mulberry, hickory, oak, and walnut trees.

May 19, 2015

 

 

 

 

FEL 5/19/2015

May 19, 2015 · fleickly · No Comments
Tags: , , , , ,  · Posted in: Grass pollen, Grass Pollen Counts, Pollen Counting, Pollen Counting- Indianapolis, Seasonal Allergies, Seasonal Allergies-Pollen Counts, Tree Pollen Counts, Weed Pollen